November 29, 2022

TheCyberThrone

Thinking Security ! Always

Anonymous Intrudes in to Russian Live WebCams

Anonymous, has hacked into more than 400 Russian cameras and overlaid text on them depicting the situation in the war-hit Ukraine. The hacks come just a day after Anonymous hacked streaming services and live TV channels in Russia to broadcast footage straight from Ukraine.

The hacker group confirmed the attack on Russian camera feeds in a new tweet on Tuesday. In the tweet, it mentioned that it has “taken control of” 400 plus Russian cameras in the attack in support of Ukraine. The group has even compiled about 100 of these camera feeds on a website behindenemylines.live as “Russian camera dump.”

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The camera feeds can be seen listed under various categories on the website, based on the location of the cameras. The categories include Businesses, Outside, Inside, Houses, Restaurants, Offices, Schools, and Security Offices. The group, however, took down the House cameras out of respect for the privacy of the Russian citizens.

The camera feeds also have an overlaid text on them, which, as per Anonymous, is meant to act as an “anti-propaganda to open the eyes of Russian civilians.” Various lines of text, like “Putin is killing children,” “352 Ukraine civilians dead,” and “Russians lied to 200RF.com,” a website that contains photos and videos, some graphic, of alleged Russian soldiers captured by its Ukraine.

The attacks by Anonymous is the latest one meant to target Russia’s alleged propaganda. On Monday morning, the hacker group took control of live TV channels in Russia, including Russia 24, Channel One, and Moscow 24 to broadcast footage from the war-hit locations in Ukraine. Russian streaming services like Wink and Ivi, which act like Netflix in the country, were also taken over in the hack.

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Anonymous maintains that “ordinary Russians are against the war,” and that it does not wish to harm the citizens of the country in any way. It reiterates that its attacks are directed on the Kremlin’s “propaganda” spread to justify its invasion of Ukraine. Though it claims to be acting on humanitarian grounds in this case, an act of cyber warfare against a nation may not be taken lightly by global authorities.

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