Zoom 2FA goes for all

Zoom has announced that it has added two-factor authentication (2FA) support to all user accounts to make it simpler to secure them against security breaches and identity theft.

With 2FA, Zoom users will have an extra layer added to the authentication process, blocking attackers from take control of their account by guessing their password or using compromised credentials.

Zoom accounts secured using 2FA will require you to enter a one-time code from a mobile authenticator app or received via SMS or phone call, in addition to the account’s password, before allowing you to sign in to the Zoom web portal, desktop client, mobile app, or Zoom Room.

“With Zoom’s 2FA, users have the option to use authentication apps that support Time-Based One-Time Password (TOTP) protocol (such as Google Authenticator, Microsoft Authenticator, and FreeOTP), or have Zoom send a code via SMS or phone call, as the second factor of the account authentication process,” .

“Zoom offers a range of authentication methods such as SAML, OAuth, and/or password-based authentication, which can be individually enabled or disabled for an account.”

Zoom 2FA

Tesla unveils MFA atlast..

Much awaited MFA introduced for Tesla app. Earlier in 2019 the initial comment came from musk of rolling out an additional security feature.. but it’s too late to introduce

Two-factor authentication — also known as two-step verification — combines something you know, like a password, with something you have, like your phone. This is a way to verify that the real account holder — or car owner — is logging in and not a hacker.

Some websites do this by sending you a code by text message. But hackers can intercept these. A more secure way of doing it is by sending a code through a phone app, often called an authenticator, which security experts prefer.

Beefing up the security on the Tesla mobile app is particularly pressing. The Tesla app is a critical tool for owners, giving them control over numerous functions on their vehicles.

When Bluetooth is enabled, the Tesla app allows drivers to use their phone as a key to Tesla’s newer vehicle models. The app also lets the user remotely lock and unlock the doors, trunk and frunk, turn on the HVAC system, monitor and control charging, locate the vehicle and schedule service — to name a few of the main capabilities.

These days, two-factor authentication is common and widely employed to stop hackers from using stolen passwords to break into users’ accounts. What’s unclear with Tesla is whether the two-factor tool will rely on SMS or a phone app. Musk said the final validation was for SMS “or” authenticator app, a statement that leaves that critical question unanswered.